How to wreck your diet without even noticing! Images of very similar meals reveal how adding extra 'healthy' foods such …

Food bloggers has revealed how making a very small tweak to a plate of food by serving yourself a slightly larger portion size or adding just a few – supposedly ‘healthy’ – extra ingredients can double the amount of calories you’re consuming.

Australian dietician Paula Norris, regularly shares plates of seemingly identical meals on Instagram that prove how you can accidentally ruin your diet with that extra slice of avocado or using just one teaspoon of oil while cooking. 

One of her snaps shows two plates of steak with rice noodles and a salad of lettuce, cherry tomatoes, avocado and red onion with a soy, lime and sesame oil dressing, which look exactly the same.

However, one meal has almost 800 calories due to an extra slice of avocado, an additional teaspoon of sesame oil, and 80g more of untrimmed steak that’s been fried in oil, while the second version has just over 400 calories because the steak is grilled and some of the noodles have been replaced with extra veg. 

Amanda Meixner, 26, from Ohio also regularly shares her meal plans and healthy eating tips with her 476,000 Instagram followers, and has recently posted a series of images showing the calorie difference between two seemingly identical plates of food, inspired by Paula.  

One image shows two eggs and two eggs whites scrambled with half an avocado on toast and a sliced apple, which amounts to just over 500 calories. 

But adding the rest of the avocado, two more eggs and a spoonful of peanut butter more than  doubles the calorie count to over a 1,000. 

Meanwhile a 472 calorie snack of yoghurt, dark chocolate, nut butter and berries suddenly becomes almost 900 calories with the addition of 40g more chocolate and 2 extra tablespoons of cashew butter.

Their posts seem especially pertinent following the release of figures from the Office for National Statistics showing that British people are underestimating their calorie intake by 50 per cent – fuelling obesity levels.

These bowls contain the  same ingredients in different amounts. Left: 180g untrimmed steak cooked in 1tsp oil. 2 cups Lettuce, 4 rings red onion, 50g avocado, 1 cup cooked rice noodles, 30g cucumber, 2 cherry tomatoes, 2 tsp sesame oil, 2 tsp lime juice, 1 tsp soy sauce. Right: 100g trimmed steak, grilled. It has the same amount of lettuce, red onion and lime juice. Hoever, there's half the avocado and rice noodles, 50g Cucumber, double the cherry Tomatoes, 1/2 a medium carrot and half the sesame oil 

These bowls contain the same ingredients in different amounts. Left: 180g untrimmed steak cooked in 1tsp oil. 2 cups Lettuce, 4 rings red onion, 50g avocado, 1 cup cooked rice noodles, 30g cucumber, 2 cherry tomatoes, 2 tsp sesame oil, 2 tsp lime juice, 1 tsp soy sauce. Right: 100g trimmed steak, grilled. It has the same amount of lettuce, red onion and lime juice. Hoever, there’s half the avocado and rice noodles, 50g Cucumber, double the cherry Tomatoes, 1/2 a medium carrot and half the sesame oil 

Throwing in that handful of extra pasta goes a long way to racking up more than 400 extra calories. Left: 200g chicken cooked in 2 tsp extra virgin olive oil, 30g semi-trimmed bacon, 2 cups cooked pasta, 30g full fat cheddar, 2 large Florets Broccoli, 1 medium mushroom. Right: 100g poached chicken, 1 cup cooked pasta, 1 tsp capers, 10g low fat cheddar, 1/4 large capsicum, 4 large florets broccoli, 2 medium mushrooms

Throwing in that handful of extra pasta goes a long way to racking up more than 400 extra calories. Left: 200g chicken cooked in 2 tsp extra virgin olive oil, 30g semi-trimmed bacon, 2 cups cooked pasta, 30g full fat cheddar, 2 large Florets Broccoli, 1 medium mushroom. Right: 100g poached chicken, 1 cup cooked pasta, 1 tsp capers, 10g low fat cheddar, 1/4 large capsicum, 4 large florets broccoli, 2 medium mushrooms

Food blogger Amanda Meixner from Ohio has revealed how a small tweak to your meal can almost double the calorie count. Left: Two eggs and two egg whites scrambled, half and avocado on toast and one apple. Right: Four eggs and two egg whites scrambled, one avocado on toast, one apple, two tablespoons of peanut butter 

Food blogger Amanda Meixner from Ohio has revealed how a small tweak to your meal can almost double the calorie count. Left: Two eggs and two egg whites scrambled, half and avocado on toast and one apple. Right: Four eggs and two egg whites scrambled, one avocado on toast, one apple, two tablespoons of peanut butter 

Left: 1 cup Greek yogurt, one teaspoon honey, 20g 85 per cent dark chocolate, one cup blueberries, 1/2 cup strawberries, 1/2 tbsp cashew butter. Right: One cup 2 per cent Greek yogurt, one tbsp honey, 60g 85 per cent dark chocolate, 1/2 cup blueberries, 1/4 cup strawberries and 2 1/2 tbsp cashew butter

Left: 1 cup Greek yogurt, one teaspoon honey, 20g 85 per cent dark chocolate, one cup blueberries, 1/2 cup strawberries, 1/2 tbsp cashew butter. Right: One cup 2 per cent Greek yogurt, one tbsp honey, 60g 85 per cent dark chocolate, 1/2 cup blueberries, 1/4 cup strawberries and 2 1/2 tbsp cashew butter

Blogger Amanda, 26, from Ohio regularly shares her healthy eating hacks with Instagram fans

Blogger Amanda, 26, from Ohio regularly shares her healthy eating hacks with Instagram fans

Australian dietitian Paula Norris has revealed how a seemingly insignificant increase in portion size really counts when it comes to racking up calories 

Australian dietitian Paula Norris has revealed how a seemingly insignificant increase in portion size really counts when it comes to racking up calories 

Men typically have 1,000 more calories every day than they account for, while women consumed about 800 more than they estimate, and the more food people  consume, the less reliable their estimates are. 

Meanwhile, data from The Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations shows that the average American consumes more than 3,600 calories daily. 

If you want to avoid piling extra calories on to your plate, Amanda recommends tricks such as having veggies noodles instead of sweet potatoes or pasta. 

‘Skip the extra olives or extra fats for more veggies,’ she recommended. Swap out some eggs for egg whites – only 17 calories per one.’

Left: This salad has a greater proportion of vegetables to black beans. Meanwhile, the salad on the right has triple the hummus, an additional tablespoon of olive oil and additional 1/4 avocado

Left: This salad has a greater proportion of vegetables to black beans. Meanwhile, the salad on the right has triple the hummus, an additional tablespoon of olive oil and additional 1/4 avocado

Left: One spiralized zucchini, one cup cherry tomatoes, one cup broccoli, one cup marinara sauce, 3.5 oz wild king salmon. Right: 1.5 spiralized sweet potatoes, nine olives, 1/2 cup cherry tomatoes 1 cup broccoli 1 cup marinara sauce 5 oz wild king salmon

Left: One spiralized zucchini, one cup cherry tomatoes, one cup broccoli, one cup marinara sauce, 3.5 oz wild king salmon. Right: 1.5 spiralized sweet potatoes, nine olives, 1/2 cup cherry tomatoes 1 cup broccoli 1 cup marinara sauce 5 oz wild king salmon

Left: 1 cup pearl barley, 70g halloumi, 1/3 Zucchini, 2 florets of broccoli, 1/4 capsicum, 50g eggplant, three cherry tomatoes,  200g poached chicken, 1/2 cup herbs, dressing of 2tsp extra virgin olive oil and 2tsp Balsamic Vinegar. Right: 1/2 cup cooked pearl barley, 35g halloumi, 2/3 Zucchini, 5 florets broccoli, 1/2 capsicum, 100g eggplant, 5 cherry tomatoes,  100g poached chicken, 1/2 cup herbs, dressing of 2 tsp balsamic vinegar and 2tsp seeded mustard

Left: 1 cup pearl barley, 70g halloumi, 1/3 Zucchini, 2 florets of broccoli, 1/4 capsicum, 50g eggplant, three cherry tomatoes,  200g poached chicken, 1/2 cup herbs, dressing of 2tsp extra virgin olive oil and 2tsp Balsamic Vinegar. Right: 1/2 cup cooked pearl barley, 35g halloumi, 2/3 Zucchini, 5 florets broccoli, 1/2 capsicum, 100g eggplant, 5 cherry tomatoes,  100g poached chicken, 1/2 cup herbs, dressing of 2 tsp balsamic vinegar and 2tsp seeded mustard

Why do Brits eat 50 per cent more calories than they realise?

Isabella Fish for The Daily Mail writes…

Britons are underestimating their calorie intake by 50 per cent – fuelling obesity levels, it has emerged.

Men typically have 1,000 more calories every day than they account for, while women consumed about 800 more than they estimate, according to figures from the Office for National Statistics.

The research also found that the more food Britons consume, the less reliable their estimates are.

Experts have suggested that people do not like to ‘be taken for slobs’ and so end up lying to themselves about how much they actually eat.

According to the data, men consumed 3,119 calories a day despite claiming that they had only 2,065. The recommended intake for men is 2,500 a day.

Women claimed that they consumed an average of 1,570 calories a day – nearly 500 calories less than the recommended intake of 2,000 – but the real figure was in fact 2,393.

The data comes as Public Health England (PHE) prepares to launch a new calorie-counting campaign, in order to try to tackle the obesity crisis.

A third of children are obese or overweight by the time they leave primary school. The figures suggest that the average person underestimates the number of calories they consume every day, fuelling the epidemic.

For the survey, 4,500 adults were asked to keep track of their calorie consumption over four days. The scientists then looked at how much energy the body used in order to calculate the real number of calories consumed.

The survey found that 34 per cent of the participants claimed to be consuming less than physically required to stay alive.

And the more overweight the people were, the less reliable the account was, according to the research.

Tam Fry, of the National Obesity Forum, told the Daily Telegraph: ‘People lie and I am not surprised that they do when it comes to food. They wish not to be taken for slobs, even though they may be just that.’

He said that the new national calorie counting campaign, which is set to begin next month, was an ‘absolutely ridiculous’ attempt to solve the problem because it was unrealistic.

The PHE advice in the One You nutrition campaign will tell adults to limit breakfast to 400 calories and dinners and lunches to just 600 calories.

The average recommended calorie consumption levels remain at 2,500 calories for men and 2,000 for women, according to those behind the campaign. But the guidance is a ‘rule of thumb’ to try to help Britons cut down the number of calories they consume.

The average adult is eating 200 to 250 more calories every day than they should, health officials say. However, the new data suggests that this could be largely underestimated.

International research shows that Britain is the fattest country in Western Europe.

The rise in obesity levels has been linked to larger portion sizes, changes in diet, junk food, takeaway meals and snacks.

 

 

Source