Town demand could delay opening of $75 million senior living complex








An artist's rendering depicts the Institute for Healthy Living.
An artist’s rendering depicts the Institute for Healthy Living.



The owner of a $75 million, 235,445-square-foot senior living and skilled nursing complex that is almost complete in Jupiter, FL, may be delayed in welcoming residents unless the town waives a requirement that the complex contain a research component as a condition of opening.

Work on the 62-bed assisted living community, 30-bed memory care community and 129-bed skilled nursing and rehabilitation facility at The Institute for Healthy Living is nearly finished, according to the Palm Beach Post. The space set aside for clinical research, however, remains unbuilt.

The promise of research helped win approval for the complex in 2010, according to the media outlet, which noted that the land on which it sits was intended to be dedicated to the life sciences.

As a condition of receiving an occupancy certificate, the town required the institute to ink decades-long formal agreements that would result in 5,000 square feet of the complex being used for clinical research, 17,000 square feet being used for medical providers and a collaboration with at least one college or university, the Palm Beach Post said. Those agreements aren’t in place, according to the newspaper, and owner ARHC NVJUPFL01 LLC, a successor company to American Capital and an affiliate of AR-Global of New York, is blaming developer Palm Health Partners.

Palm Health Partners, the Palm Beach Post said, is owned by Elizabeth Fago; her son, Paul Walczak; and Dean Tendrich, son of the late Steven Tendrich, a real estate developer. Fago also leads NuVista Living, which operates NuVista Living at Wellington Green, an assisted living and rehabilitation facility in Wellington, FL, the newspaper said.

ARHC bought the property in 2015 for $10 million, but Palm Health Partners agreed to oversee its completion, according to the Palm Beach Post. In May, however, ARHC and Palm Health Partners had a “falling out” and Palm Health stopped working on the institute, the newspaper said. Around that time, relations between the institute, the adjacent Scripps Research Center and Jupiter Medical Center soured, too, according to the media outlet.

Jupiter’s town council is supposed to consider the matter at its October meeting.



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