Woman loses 50kg after four years of hard work and healthy eating

Bex Gordon has lost 50kg in four years by focusing on diet and incorporating exercise.

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Bex Gordon has lost 50kg in four years by focusing on diet and incorporating exercise.

A Christchurch woman has lost 50kg the old-fashioned way through four years of healthy eating and exercise.

Bex Gordon says when people ask how she did it, her answer is never what they want to hear. 

“Everybody wants a quick fix. They want to know where, why, how, and when, but they hate the answer, which is just diet and exercise.” 

Weighing in at 126kg in the lead up to her 21st birthday, Gordon said it was at that point she realised things needed to change. 

Gordon celebrating the 50kg milestone.

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Gordon celebrating the 50kg milestone.

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“I remember thinking to myself, this isn’t a lifestyle I want to lead. I always imagined there would be a change, so I just kind of decided to slowly start making that change.”

Starting small, Gordon watched 20kg “slip off” during the first year, simply by cutting out fast food and walking. 

“When you’re that big, small changes like walking three times a week and cutting out fast food make a massive difference.”

Having never consulted with a dietician, personal trainer or doctor about her weight loss, Gordon learned everything she knows about nutrition through her own research, using trial and error to figure out what works best for her body. 

“I always knew you had to eat less than what you were putting out, but I didn’t know what that meant until I did my own research and learned about getting in a calorie deficit.”

Finding success by cutting out meat and counting calories on the MyFitnessPal app, tracking food is a reality Gordon says is just a part of daily life these days. 

“I always track my food and weigh my food. It’s boring and it’s annoying, but it’s how you get results.”

Gordon says these days, her body feels 'clean'.

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Gordon says these days, her body feels ‘clean’.

An admin-heavy approach, she stands firm in the fact it’s a small price to pay in exchange for a clear bill of health. 

“I’m so much less lethargic, I have more energy, and I don’t get stomach aches. I was never a morning person and I’m up at the crack of dawn now. 

“I had fish and chips a few months ago, and my body totally rejected it.

“I feel healthier and clean, for lack of a better word,” she adds.

The second aspect of portion control Gordon had to re-learn was the art of intuitive eating, something she admits she’d completely lost touch with.

“I didn’t know what it was to be full anymore, so I conducted a lot of research around intuitive eating.

“I think that’s really important because when you are so overweight, you don’t know what it is to be full anymore, because you eat so much. You need to relearn hunger.”

An effort that hasn’t been without its struggles, Gordon says the plateaus she’s faced forced her to shake things up, the most recent of which saw her take up F45, a move that helped her cross the 50kg mark.

“There were points every six months where I would hit a plateau and not see any weight shift, which can be really difficult.

“Your body gets used to what you’re giving it, so you always need to be changing up what you’re doing.

“I was going to the gym and focusing on a lot of weight training because I hated cardio. I decided to throw it all in at the gym for a year and start up doing F45, and that definitely busted me through the plateau.”

When it comes to advice for people just starting on the weight loss journey, Gordon stresses the importance of tackling diet before launching into an exercise regime.

“Nutrition is 80 per cent and exercise is 20 per cent – that’s how it works for me. 

“It’s about making smart choices. You don’t need to starve, it’s just about upping your vegetables and keeping the protein in your meal. I think when people hear protein they think of gym shakes, but protein keeps you fuller for longer, so it’s about making the connection to staying full.”

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